Explore our Medicare Plan Options & Enroll

Our Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plans can help pay some of the health care costs that Original Medicare doesn't cover, like copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles.

We are currently running a special enrollment period from Oct. 15 - Dec. 15, 2017 where you can enroll in one of our Medicare plans with no health questions asked!

Simply enter the county you live in and click Go, to see our Medicare plans that are available to you or call (888) 535-4831.

Medicare

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Getting Started With Medicare

Whether you’re new to Medicare, getting ready to turn 65, or preparing to retire, you’ll need to prepare to make important decisions about your health coverage. Waiting to enroll, may cause you to pay a penalty, or have a gap in your coverage.

Step 1: Learn about the different pieces of Medicare

The different pieces of Medicare help cover specific services.

  • Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers:
    • Inpatient hospital stays
    • Care in a skilled nursing facility
    • Hospice care
    • Some home health care
  • Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers:
    • Certain doctors' services
    • Outpatient care
    • Medical supplies
    • Preventive services

Step 2: Find out when you can get Medicare

There are only certain times when people can enroll in Medicare. Depending on the situation, some people may get Medicare automatically, and others need to apply for Medicare. The first time you can enroll is called your Initial Enrollment Period.

Your 7-month Initial Enrollment Period usually:

  • Begins 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • Includes the month you turn 65
  • Ends 3 months after the month you turn 65

Get an estimate of when you can enroll in Medicare
If you don’t enroll when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty, and you may have a gap in your coverage.

Step 3: Decide if you want Part A & Part B

Most people should enroll in Part A when they turn 65, even if they have health insurance from an employer. This is because most people paid Medicare taxes while they worked so they don’t pay a monthly premium for Part A. Certain people may choose to delay Part B.

In most cases, it depends on the type of health coverage you may have. Everyone pays a monthly premium for Part B. The premium varies depending on your income and when you enroll in Part B.

Step 4: Choose your coverage

If you decide you want Part A and Part B, there are 2 main ways to get your Medicare coverage.

  • Original Medicare
  • Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO).

Some people get additional coverage, like Medicare prescription drug coverage or Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap). Most people who are still working and have employer coverage don’t need additional coverage.

Step 5: Sign up for Medicare (unless you’ll get it automatically)

Some people automatically get Part A and Part B. It’s important to find out if you’ll get Part A and B automatically. If you're automatically enrolled, you'll get your red, white, and blue Medicare card in the mail 3 months before your 65th birthday or your 25th month of disability. If you don't get Medicare automatically, you’ll need to apply for Medicare online.

Source: https://www.medicare.gov/people-like-me/new-to-medicare/getting-started-with-medicare.html

What is Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

A Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) policy, sold by private companies, can help pay some of the health care costs that Original Medicare doesn't cover, like copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles. Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn't cover such as medical care when you travel outside the U.S.

If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share. A Medigap policy is different from a Medicare Advantage Plan. Those plans are ways to get Medicare benefits, while a Medigap policy only supplements your Original Medicare benefits.

8 things to know about Medigap policies
  1. You must have Medicare Part A and Part B.
  2. If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can apply for a Medigap policy, but make sure you can leave the Medicare Advantage Plan before your Medigap policy begins.
  3. You pay the private insurance company a monthly premium for your Medigap policy in addition to the monthly Part B premium that you pay to Medicare.
  4. A Medigap policy only covers one person. If you and your spouse both want Medigap coverage, you'll each have to buy separate policies.
  5. You can buy a Medigap policy from any insurance company that's licensed in your state to sell one.
  6. Any standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable even if you have health problems. This means the insurance company can't cancel your Medigap policy as long as you pay the premium.
  7. Some Medigap policies sold in the past cover prescription drugs, but Medigap policies sold after January 1, 2006 aren't allowed to include prescription drug coverage. If you want prescription drug coverage, you can join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan (Part D).
  8. It's illegal for anyone to sell you a Medigap policy if you have a Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) Plan.
Medigap policies don't cover everything

Medigap policies generally don't cover long-term care, vision or dental care, hearing aids, eyeglasses, or private-duty nursing.

Insurance plans that aren't Medigap

Some types of insurance aren't Medigap plans, they include:

  • Medicare Advantage Plans (like an HMO, PPO, or Private Fee-for-Service Plan)
  • Medicare Prescription Drug Plans
  • Medicaid
  • Employer or union plans, including the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP)
  • TRICARE
  • Veterans' benefits
  • Long-term care insurance policies
  • Indian Health Service, Tribal, and Urban Indian Health plans
Dropping your entire Medigap policy

If you decide to drop your entire Medigap policy, you need to be careful about the timing. You may want a completely different Medigap policy—not just your old Medigap policy without the prescription drug coverage. Or you might decide to switch to a Medicare Advantage Plan that offers prescription drug coverage.

You have to pay a late enrollment penalty when you join a new Medicare drug plan if:

  • You drop your entire Medigap policy and the drug coverage wasn't creditable prescription drug coverage, or
  • You go 63 days or more in a row before your new Medicare drug coverage begins

Source: https://www.medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap/whats-medigap.html

Medigap & Travel

Your Medigap policy may offer additional coverage for health care services or supplies that you get outside the U.S.

  • Standard Medigap Plans C, D, F, G, M, and N provide foreign travel emergency health care coverage when you travel outside the U.S.
  • Plans E, H, I, and J are no longer for sale, but if you bought one before June 1, 2010 you may keep it. All of these plans also provide foreign travel emergency health care coverage when you travel outside the U.S.
Medigap coverage outside the U.S.

If you have Medigap Plan C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, M or N, your plan:

  • Covers foreign travel emergency care if it begins during the first 60 days of your trip, and if Medicare doesn't otherwise cover the care.
  • Pays 80% of the billed charges for certain medically necessary emergency care outside the U.S. after you meet a $250 deductible for the year.

 Foreign travel emergency coverage with Medigap policies has a lifetime limit of $50,000.

Find out before you go

Before you travel outside the U.S., talk with your Medigap plan or insurance agent to get more information about your Medigap coverage while traveling.

Source: https://www.medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap-and-travel/medigap-and-travel.html

When Can I Buy Medigap?

Medigap insurance companies are generally allowed to use medical underwriting to decide whether to accept your application and how much to charge you for the Medigap policy. However, even if you have health problems, during your Medigap open enrollment period you can buy any policy the company sells for the same price as people with good health.

If you apply for Medigap coverage after your open enrollment period, there's no guarantee that an insurance company will sell you a Medigap policy if you don’t meet the medical underwriting requirements, unless you're eligible due to one of the situations below.

In some states, you may be able to buy another type of Medigap policy called Medicare SELECT. If you buy a Medigap SELECT policy, you have rights to change your mind within 12 months and switch to a standard Medigap policy.